HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME

It’s my birthday, it’s my birthday, I’m going to spend my money… on books.

WAIT NO, I still have about £150 of book vouchers! And it’s not even my birthday, it’s the blog’s third birthday, and because anything that is three years old is still rather insentient, it doesn’t matter what I buy them because they won’t remember anyway. (The parents will though; they’re the ones you’re trying to please by going Jimmy’s birthday. Jimmy won’t care if you gave him stick- he’d actually be delighted- but the parents would look on in deep anger. They didn’t spend £400 buying invitations that matched their wall paper for nothing.) And it’s a blog. Not a human, so no gifts required.

Anyway, this year, instead of handing out cake like last time (I mean, unless it’s gluten-free, dairy-free, and bad-karma free, no one would it anyway), I’m going to be setting some blog goals:

  • Keep up the poetry (although irritatingly I cannot enter poems I’ve put on here into competitions, so I might wait until I’ve entered them and then post them)
  • To try and sneak in some author interviews
  • To branch out into films (I’ll explain in another post)
  • To get y’all some insight into pre-released books

giphy

 

I thought four goals was a decent number to have, reflecting the fact that The Ink Cloud would be entering into its fourth year. If you’ve got suggestions, please pop it into the comments section below and I’ll see what I can do 🙂

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SUMMER CHALLENGE

You know it’s summer when leave the library staggering under the weight of thirty insanely erudite books you hope you will finally have time to read.

I have been given a list of books which I have been asked to read and absorb over the summer, and frankly it’s a bit of a challenge. Not the reading in itself, but more the slight apprehension surrounding the discussion afterwards when I arrive back at college.

Of course, reading The Great Gatsby is no difficulty, but will I be able to understand all the nuances and symbols of it in one read? No. But I don’t want to look like a fool, bashing some literary classic until a fellow wizened student turns to me and reminds me that the “pointless” character I’m referring to is a metaphor for anarchy. Or something. So along with all the reviews I’ll be doing over the summer, I’ll try and do a bit more analysis into the central themes and characters just so I am a bit more ‘clued up’. Anyhow, here are the books:

The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
The Great Gatsby – Scott Fitzgerald                                                                                                Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy                                                                                             A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man – James Joyce
One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
The God of Small Things – Arundhati Roy                                                                                         Mrs Dalloway – Virginia Woolf

So this is about one book a week over the Summer, which will be more easily done than others because some weeks are looking to be quite packed (like when I’m going to perform at the Edinburgh Fringe)! Now, on the official reading list there are 32 books, including Anna Karina and Great Expectations. We have to read at least 3 books, and so I’ve tactically decided to read the slightly shorter one -bear with me- because if I’m going to be reading 600 pages, I’d rather it be spread across 3 novels than one, so that I hit two birds with one stone. A bit cheeky, I know, but there’s a logic to my madness… because I also have a Classics reading list to delve into. Greek and Latin literature! So mainstream! Anyway, I’m hoping to also read:

The Iliad                                                                                                                                                  The Odysessy                                                                                                                                     The Tom Holland books                                                                                                                         A prose version of the Aeneid                                                                                                  Horace’s Odes and Satires,                                                                                                             SPQR by Mary Beard

Plays: Medea                                                                                                                                 Oedipus Rex,                                                                                                                         Aristophanes ‘Frogs’

Have you tackled any of these Classic Classics? If so, let me know what you think and if you have any other recommendations! But until then, I better start reading… or revising because I still have two exams left and should stop procrastinating.