Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman (July Book of the Month)

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A darkly hilarious and witty novel exploring the day the world will end.

In a typical science fiction style, there is a concept, widely known- such as the end of the world- but through the lens of literature is spun around and examined deeply. Here, the embodiment of Good, Aziraphale an angel and Evil, Crowley a demon (formerly Crawley the snake from the garden of Eden) battle over who can manipulate the Antichirst into siding with them, so that when the fateful Judgement day arrives with the expected war, the child would launch a particular side to victory.  Not that the pair wanted a war. Both the angel and demon rather enjoyed being on Earth, having gotten used to human schisms in the way that their compatriots hadn’t. In fact, the Crowley and Aziraphale have a close friendship: not only have they known each other centuries, but they realised that they actually had more in common that anyone could imagine. Yet thanks to a mishap in the baby-swap securing the Antichrist, the forces shadowed and prodded the wrong child for over a decade, meaning that instead of bursting with virtues or spewing threats, the 11 year old antichrist Adam was just a defiant country boy, and an ordinary boy Warlock had been wrongly harassed by demons and angels his entire life. That’s where the trouble started.

When two of the funniest, most renowned authors in their field join to write a novel, it will produce something glorious. There are a wide range of characters, from Metatron (the voice of God) to KGB agents who feed ducks. The hilarity, but not obtuseness, that pervades this novel is astounding, and is guaranteed to provoke reactions from even the sternest of readers. (It even says in the Afternote that all the pair were trying to do was to make each other laugh.)

It started off as a parody of the Just William books, where William was the Antichrist, but soon evolved into something much smarter and engaging: after all, on the Judgement Day there are Four Horsemen, although as it’s modern day, it’s now Bikers. Famine, for one, sells diet books and invented nouvelle cuisine, whilst War was a war-correspondent, who somehow always managed to be in areas of conflict before they even started (the other two Bikers can be a surprise for you to find out). All said, it’s amazing. Even better is Anathema Device, a self-procclamed occultist with a book from her ancestor- The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter- that predicts correctly the future. (As it was so accurate, nobody bought it.) This supernatural element is counter-balanced by Newt Pulsifer though, who is a begrudging member of the Witchfinder’s Army, and has the awkward history of his ancestor burning alive Agnes, making the union between the two incredibly interesting.

The highlight of this book for me was undoubtedly the intricate footnotes. Apparently Gaiman and Pratchett would write footnotes for each other’s work, resulting in quips  bursting with puns, which always lightened the mood. On the other hand, the subplots added a great twist to the story, helpfully giving the reader a refreshed perspective of the main plot as they often added useful background information. But occasionally they were spasmodically inserted and felt random, being often obscure and hard to follow, and felt like sometimes they were only there so that a few jokes could be made.

I would recommend this novel to fans of fantasy, science-fiction, or anyone who is vaguely interested in the works of either author. It’s a fantastic reading experience!

 

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July Book of the Month- Red Rising by Pierce Brown

The current plan is to send another unmanned spacecraft Mars for 2020, eventually resulting (several decades later,) in permanent human settlement. If the plans of the nonprofitable charity, Mars One, succeed, that is. This makes Red Rising a more topical novel than ever, as there is only 4 years to the proposed rocket launch date. Why? It is a thrilling science fiction set on the fearsome terrain of Mars, and will delight fans of the Hunger Games.

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Darrow is part of an indefatigable race of miners, called Reds, who have been dispatched on Mars to extract crucial minerals from te entrails of the planet- minerals that are vital if humans are to eternally inhabit the planet. Allegedly. But when Darrow is suddenly ripped from his isolated, primitively set up society of Red, by a rebellious organisation, his perspective shifts as he realises that he has been hooded by a pretence his whole life. However, Darrow can’t dwell on this shocking revelation; he was enlightened for a purpose: to infiltrate the most revered race of human society- the Golds. Yet first Darrow must not only survive, but flourish in the bestial academy- where the competitors are savage, and the stakes sickeningly high.

I was captivated by the concept of this new unique society, where rank and status are conveyed by a certain colour, with the Golds mercilessly towering above everything else in the Universe. I thought that the quirky civilisation on the surface of Mars was written with a mesmerising flair, and I am intrigued to discover more about in the sequels that will undoubtedly emerge. However, the battlefield, also known as a school, is definitely an altered Hunger Games arena. Instead of Districts though, there are Houses, and there are still patrons overseeing the entire affair offering gifts to a favoured few. Although this glaring similarity was writhing throughout my thoughts as I read the novel, I still enjoyed the dynamics of the characters, as well as seeing how the plot unfolds. But yes, it is interchangeable with the Hunger Games. Just on Mars.

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There were scrupulous descriptions in this novel, splattered with vibrant bursts of poetic language- this incontestably added to the rising tension and suspense.

This fierce novel is teeming with nauseating deaths and repugnant violence, so this plot will resonate and affect YA most affectively. I can assure that you will be exhilarated as you’re hurled directly into the harsh world that Darrow endures- even if Katniss Everdeen is lingering in your thoughts. After my first excursion into science fiction was less positive than I hoped, I was recommended this by someone through my blog- I just want to quickly say thank you as I truly enjoyed this novel, and I doubt I would have discovered it without you!